Category Archives: Digitization

Long live RSS

Screen Shot 2015-07-10 at 2.35.17 PM

I just made a new Tumblr. It’s called “Recently Digitized Design.” It took me all of five minutes. I hope this blog post will take me all of ten.

But it’s actually kinda cool, and here’s why. Cooper Hewitt is in the midst of mass digitization project where we will have digitized our entire collection of over 215K objects by mid to late next year. Wow! 215K objects. That’s impressive, especially when you consider that probably 5000 of those are buttons!

What’s more is that we now have a pretty decent “pipeline” up and running. This means that as objects are being digitized and added to our collections management system, they are automatically winding up on our collections website after winding their way through a pretty hefty series of processing tasks.

Over on the West Coast, Aaron, felt the need to make a little RSS feed for these “recently digitized” so we could all easily watch the new things come in. RSS, which stands for “Rich Site Summary”, has been around forever, and many have said that it is now a dead technology.

Lately I’ve been really interested in the idea of Microservices. I guess I never really thought of it this way, but an RSS or ATOM feed is kind of a microservice. Here’s a highlight from “Building Microservices by Sam Newman” that explains this idea in more detail.

Another approach is to try to use HTTP as a way of propagating events. ATOM is a REST-compliant specification that defines semantics ( among other things ) for publishing feeds of resources. Many client libraries exist that allow us to create and consume these feeds. So our customer service could just publish an event to such a feed when our customer service changes. Our consumers just poll the feed, looking for changes.

Taking this a bit further, I’ve been reading this blog post, which explains how one might turn around and publish RSS feeds through an existing API. It’s an interesting concept, and I can see us making use of it for something just like Recently Digitized Design. It sort of brings us back to the question of how we publish our content on the web in general.

In the case of Recently Digitized Design the RSS feed is our little microservice that any client can poll. We then use IFTTT as the client, and Tumblr as the output where we are publishing the new data every day. 

RSS certainly lives up to its nickname ( Really Simple Syndication ), offering a really simple way to serve up new data, and that to me makes it a useful thing for making quick and dirty prototypes like this one. It’s not a streaming API or a fancy push notification service, but it gets the job done, and if you log in to your Tumblr Dashboard, please feel free to follow it. You’ll be presented with 10-20 newly photographed objects from our collection each day.

UPDATE:

So this happened: http://twitter.com/recentlydigital

Sorting, Synonyms and a Pretty Pony

We’ve been undergoing a massive rapid-capture digitization project here at the Cooper Hewitt, which means every day brings us pictures of things that probably haven’t been seen for a very, very long time.

As an initial way to view all these new images of objects, I added “date last photographed” to our search index and allowed it to be sorted by on the search results page.

That’s when I found this.

Figure Of A Pony (Germany), ca. 1930. Glazed earthenware. Gift of Victor Wiener. 2000-47-20

Some of the people involved with this object include

I hope we can all agree that this pony is adorable and that if there is anything else like it in our collection, it needs to be seen right now. I started browsing around the other recently photographed objects and began to notice more animal figurines:

Rooster Figure, 20th century. porcelain. Gift of J. Lionberger Davis. 1968-1-26

Figure (China). porcelain. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest du Pont. 1980-55-2

As serendipitous as it was that I came across this wonderful collection-within-a-collection by browsing through recently-photographed objects, what if someone is specifically looking for this group? The whole process shows off some of the work we did last summer switching our search backend over to Elasticsearch (which I recently presented at Museums and the Web). We wanted to make it easier to add new things so we could provide users (and ourselves) with as many “ways in” to the collection as possible, as it’s those entry points that allow for more emergent groupings to be uncovered. This is great for somebody who is casually spending time scrolling through pictures, but a user who wants to browse is different from a user who wants to search. Once we uncover a connected group of objects, what can we do to make it easier to find in the future?

Enter synonyms. Synonyms, as you might have guessed, are a text analysis technique we can use in our search engine to relate words together. In our case, I wanted to relate a bunch of animal names to the word “animal,” so that anyone searching for terms like “animals” or “animal figurines” would see all these great little friends. Like this bear.

Figure, 1989. porcelain, enameled and gilded decoration. 1990-111-1

Some of the people involved with this object include

The actual rule (generated with the help of Wikipedia’s list of animal names) is this:

 "animal => aardvark, albatross, alligator, alpaca, ant, anteater, antelope, ape, armadillo, baboon, badger, barracuda, bat, bear, beaver, bee, bird, bison, boar, butterfly, camel, capybara, caribou, cassowary, cat, kitten, caterpillar, calf, bull, cheetah, chicken, rooster, chimpanzee, chinchilla, chough, clam, cobra, cockroach, cod, cormorant, coyote, puppy, crab, crocodile, crow, curlew, deer, dinosaur, dog, puppy, salmon, dolphin, donkey, dotterel, dove, dragonfly, duck, poultry, dugong, dunlin, eagle, echidna, eel, elephant, seal, elk, emu, falcon, ferret, finch, fish, flamingo, fly, fox, frog, gaur, gazelle, gerbil, panda, giraffe, gnat, goat, sheep, goose, poultry, goldfish, gorilla, blackback, goshawk, grasshopper, grouse, guanaco, fowl, poultry, guinea, pig, gull, hamster, hare, hawk, goshawk, sparrowhawk, hedgehog, heron, herring, hippopotamus, hornet, swarm, horse, foal, filly, mare, pig, human, hummingbird, hyena, ibex, ibis, jackal, jaguar, jellyfish, planula, polyp, scyphozoa, kangaroo, kingfisher, koala, dragon, kookabura, kouprey, kudu, lapwing, lark, lemur, leopard, lion, llama, lobster, locust, loris, louse, lyrebird, magpie, mallard, manatee, mandrill, mantis, marten, meerkat, mink, mongoose, monkey, moose, venison, mouse, mosquito, mule, narwhal, newt, nightingale, octopus, okapi, opossum, oryx, ostrich, otter, owl, oyster, parrot, panda, partridge, peafowl, poultry, pelican, penguin, pheasant, pigeon, bear, pony, porcupine, porpoise, quail, quelea, quetzal, rabbit, raccoon, rat, raven, deer, panda, reindeer, rhinoceros, salamander, salmon, sandpiper, sardine, scorpion, lion, sea urchin, seahorse, shark, sheep, hoggett, shrew, skunk, snail, escargot, snake, sparrow, spider, spoonbill, squid, calamari, squirrel, starling, stingray, stinkbug, stork, swallow, swan, tapir, tarsier, termite, tiger, toad, trout, poultry, turtle, vulture, wallaby, walrus, wasp, buffalo, carabeef, weasel, whale, wildcat, wolf, wolverine, wombat, woodcock, woodpecker, worm, wren, yak, zebra"

Where every word to the right of the => automatically gets added to a search for a word to the left.

Not only does our new search stack provide us with a useful way to discover emergent relationships, but it makes it easy for us to “seal them in,” allowing multiple types of user to get the most from our collections site.

Video Capture for Collection Objects

Stepping inside a museum storage facility is a cool experience. Your usual gallery ambience (dramatic lighting, luxurious swaths of empty space, tidy labels that confidently explain all) is completely reversed. Fluorescent lights are overhead, keycode entry pads protect every door, and official ID badges are worn by every person you see. It’s like a hospital, but instead of patients there are 17th century nightgowns and Art Deco candelabras. Nestled into tiny, sterile beds of acid-free tissue paper and archival linen, the patients are occasionally woken and gently wheeled around for a state-of-the-art microscope scan, an elaborate chemical test, or a loving set of sutures.

A gloved, cardigan-ed museum worker pushing a rolling cart down a hallway of large white shelving units.

A rare peek inside the storage facility.

If you ask a staff member for an explanation of this or that object on the nearest cart or shelf, they might tell you a detailed story, or they might say that so far, not much is known. I like the element of unevenness in our knowledge, it’s very different from the uniform level of confidence one sees in a typical exhibition.

The web makes it possible to open this space to the public in all its unpolished glory – and many other museums have made significant inroads into new audiences by pulling back the curtain. The prospect is like catnip for the intellectually curious, but hemlock for most museum employees.

Typically, the only form of media that escapes this secretive storage facility are hi-res TIFFs artfully shot in an on-site photography studio. The seamless white backdrop and perfectly staged lighting, while beautiful and ideal for documentation, completely belie the working lab environment in which they were made.

We just launched a new video project called “Collections in Motion.” The idea is super simple: short videos that demonstrate collections objects that move, flip, click, fold, or have any moveable part.

Here are some of the underlying thoughts framing the project:

  • Still images don’t suffice for some objects. Many of them have moving parts, make sounds, have a sense of weight, etc that can’t be conveyed through images.
  • Our museum’s most popular videos on YouTube are all kinetic, kinda entrancing, moving objects. (Contour Craft 3D Printing, A Folding Bicycle, and a Pop-up Book, for example).
  • Videos played in the gallery generally don’t have sound or speakers available.
  • In research interviews with various types of visitors, many people said that they wouldn’t be interested in watching a long, involved video in a museum context.
  • Animated GIFs, 6-second Vines, and 15-second Instagram videos loom large in our contemporary visual/communication culture.
  • How might we think of the media we produce (videos, images, etc) as a part of an iterative process that we can learn from over time? Can we get comfortable with a lower quality but higher number of videos going out to the public, and seeing what sticks (through likes, comments, viewcount, etc)?

 

A screenshot from YouTube Analytics showing most popular videos: Contour Crafting, Folding Bicycle, Puss in Boots Pop-up book, et cetera

Our most popular YouTube videos for this quarter. They are all somewhat mesmerizing/cabinet-of-curiosity type things.

Here are some of the constraints on the project:

  • No budget (pairs nicely with the preceding bullet).
  • Moving collections objects is a conservation no-no. Every human touch, vibration and rub is bad for the long-long-longevity of the object (and not to mention the peace of mind of our conservators).
  • Conservators’ and curators’ time is in HIGH demand, especially as we get closer to our re-opening. They are busy writing new books, crafting wall labels, preparing gallery displays, etc. Finding a few hours to pull an object from storage and move it around on camera is a big challenge.

So, nerd world, what do you think?

Exploring quickly made 3D models of the mansion

Restoring the Carnegie Mansion which provides the shell in which Cooper-Hewitt resides, gives a fantastic opportunity to test some 3D scanning. So in the latter part of 2012 we started exploring some of the options.

One local startup, Floored.com, came to do a test scan of our freshly restored National Design Library. In just 15 minutes their Matterport camera had scanned the room and their servers were generating a navigable 3D model. This is much more than a 360 panorama, it is a proper 3D model, and one that could, with more clean up be used for exhibition design purposes as much as general playfulness.

3d-library-floored

We’re pretty excited to see what is becoming possible with quick scanning. Whilst these models aren’t high enough resolution right now, the trade off between speed and quality is becoming less and less every year.

We’re sharing this, too, because of the way the unmasked mirror in the scan has created a ‘room that isn’t there’. It would be a good place to hide treasure if the 3D model ever ended up in a game engine.

Go have an explore.